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Net Neutrality

France slowly advances towards net neutrality?

13 March, 2013
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This article is also available in:
Deutsch: Macht Frankreich Fortschritte in Richtung Netzneutralität?


During an intergovernmental seminar on digital policy on 28 February 2013, French Prime Minister Jean-Marc Ayrault announced the preparation for 2014 of a law “on the protection of digital rights and freedoms” which seemed to bring some improvements in online freedom protection, mainly in the net neutrality direction.

The National Digital Council (Conseil national du numérique – CNNum) was to express its opinion on net neutrality first.

CEO Coalition - the blind leading the bland

2 February, 2013
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After a year of working group meetings, the “CEO Coalition to make the Internet a better place for kids” produces its final documents on 4 February. The outcome of the project is a set of voluntary guidelines divided into five broad headings, ranging from “reporting tools” to “notice and takedown,” It is intended that this will be followed up by a meeting, in about six months, between Commissioner Kroes and the CEOs of the companies responsible. The meeting is designed to put pressure on the CEOs to fully implement the “voluntary” measures.

Kroes ignoring the problems on net neutrality?

30 January, 2013
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This article is also available in:
Deutsch: [Netzneutralität: Ignoriert Kommissarin Kroes alle Gefahren?

Slovenia has a net neutrality law

30 January, 2013
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This article is also available in:
Deutsch: Slowenien schreibt Netzneutralität per Gesetz vor


On 20 December 2012, the Slovenian Parliament approved a legislative framework (the Economic Communications Bill) that includes net neutrality, confirming the open and neutral character of the Internet and forbidding the discrimination of Internet traffic on the basis of the services provided.

Although the text of the law is not entirely clear, it seems that ISPs will not be allowed to restrict or delay Internet traffic, unless the purpose is to solve congestions, preserve security or address spam, and they will not be allowed to cha

French Minister asks US company to uphold France's values

16 January, 2013
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This article is also available in:
Deutsch: Frankreich: US-Unternehmen soll französische Werte hochhalten


The French government seems to be very confused regarding questions of net neutrality and interference in networks. In the first two weeks of the new year, the new government managed to contradict itself by organising a round-table to discuss the importance of net neutrality on the one hand... and by asking a private corporation to interfere with communications on its network, on the other.

Digitale Gesellschaft promotes net neutrality with Vodafail actions

19 December, 2012
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This article is also available in:
Deutsch: Vodafail: Digitale Gesellschaft setzt sich für Netzneutralität ein


There are only a few telecom operators in Germany which offer mobile Internet. The two largest, Deutsche Telekom and Vodafone, harm net neutrality in numerous of their tariffs – deeply hidden in their contract terms.

The European Parliament supports net neutrality

19 December, 2012
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This article is also available in:
Deutsch: Europäisches Parlament setzt sich Netzneutralität ein


On 11 December 2012, The European Parliament (EP) issued, in a large majority, two non-legislative resolutions asking that net neutrality should be enshrined in the European Union law.

In one of the resolutions, “Completing the Digital Single Market”, the EP "calls on the Commission to propose legislation to ensure net neutrality" and urges Commissioner Kroes to end her ill-fated "wait and see" approach.

The second resolution, “Digital Freedom Strategy in EU Foreign Policy”, stresses that the EP "strongl

"Voluntary enforcement" vs legal restrictions - what rules apply?

11 December, 2012
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Sometimes, watching the Commission make up its mind on a controversial topic is like watching a sports match. One of these topics is the question of whether it is legal for governments to encourage internet service providers (ISPs) to restrict fundamental rights “voluntarily” or whether they would need a legal basis. The European Home Affairs Commissioner, Cecilia Malmström is certain... that they do, that they don't and that they might... possibly.

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